22nd July 2014

s
s

22nd July 2014

Being Indiana Jones. 
Beng Melea is the place to ponder about how Angkor must have looked like, to explorers who found it completely in ruins. The only “restoration” here is in the form of raised wooden platforms to safely access the inside.
But at a certain point, those stop too. So the options are - climb the pile of rocks and explore further, or go back. We choose the former, much to the chagrin of our guide, who insists I have too much skirt in my long dress to scramble on rocks, walls and tree trunks. I happily prove him wrong and am treated to an amazing afternoon of discovery.
From my Angkor Series (9 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

http://far-and-back.tumblr.com

Being Indiana Jones. 
Beng Melea is the place to ponder about how Angkor must have looked like, to explorers who found it completely in ruins. The only “restoration” here is in the form of raised wooden platforms to safely access the inside.
But at a certain point, those stop too. So the options are - climb the pile of rocks and explore further, or go back. We choose the former, much to the chagrin of our guide, who insists I have too much skirt in my long dress to scramble on rocks, walls and tree trunks. I happily prove him wrong and am treated to an amazing afternoon of discovery.
From my Angkor Series (9 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

http://far-and-back.tumblr.com

Being Indiana Jones. 

Beng Melea is the place to ponder about how Angkor must have looked like, to explorers who found it completely in ruins. The only “restoration” here is in the form of raised wooden platforms to safely access the inside.

But at a certain point, those stop too. So the options are - climb the pile of rocks and explore further, or go back. We choose the former, much to the chagrin of our guide, who insists I have too much skirt in my long dress to scramble on rocks, walls and tree trunks. I happily prove him wrong and am treated to an amazing afternoon of discovery.

From my Angkor Series (9 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

Source: far-and-back

 ·  4 notes  ·  comments

21st July 2014

s
s

21st July 2014

Evenings in Siem Reap. 
Watching thousands of fruit bats take flight from the trees outside the Raffles exactly after sunset each evening is a spectacle worth patiently waiting for.
So is watching temple flower stall owners painstakingly weave / fold floral offerings for devotees to buy. Deceptively simple, but obviously takes years of practice to perfect!
Practice is also what makes the Apsara dancers so precise in their movements. This is a classical style dating back to the Angkorean era, surviving despite being nearly wiped out during the Khmer Rouge regime. 
From my Angkor Series (8 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

http://tmblr.co/ZeR3hw1M4zp08

Evenings in Siem Reap. 
Watching thousands of fruit bats take flight from the trees outside the Raffles exactly after sunset each evening is a spectacle worth patiently waiting for.
So is watching temple flower stall owners painstakingly weave / fold floral offerings for devotees to buy. Deceptively simple, but obviously takes years of practice to perfect!
Practice is also what makes the Apsara dancers so precise in their movements. This is a classical style dating back to the Angkorean era, surviving despite being nearly wiped out during the Khmer Rouge regime. 
From my Angkor Series (8 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

http://tmblr.co/ZeR3hw1M4zp08

Evenings in Siem Reap. 

Watching thousands of fruit bats take flight from the trees outside the Raffles exactly after sunset each evening is a spectacle worth patiently waiting for.

So is watching temple flower stall owners painstakingly weave / fold floral offerings for devotees to buy. Deceptively simple, but obviously takes years of practice to perfect!

Practice is also what makes the Apsara dancers so precise in their movements. This is a classical style dating back to the Angkorean era, surviving despite being nearly wiped out during the Khmer Rouge regime. 

From my Angkor Series (8 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

Source: far-and-back

 ·  8 notes  ·  comments

20th July 2014

s
s
s

20th July 2014

Another New Day.
At 4 AM, I climb Phnom Krom Hill to visit the monks of the Phnom Krom Pagoda at dawn as they perform their morning prayers. The abbot is a kind and patient man who doesn’t object to the presence of curious picture-taking people.
This modern-day monastery shares its hill with a 11th century temple that looks like it has been long forgotten, though it still maintains its peaceful groundedness amidst all the dilapidation.
The monks at Phnom Krom monastery are still chanting as I watch the sun rise over Tonle Sap lake. The orange rays fall on the villages built on stilts down below just as a group of dragonflies flits by my camera lens.
I marvel at the magic of another new day. 
From my Angkor Series (7 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

http://tmblr.co/ZeR3hw1L_-uLv

Another New Day.
At 4 AM, I climb Phnom Krom Hill to visit the monks of the Phnom Krom Pagoda at dawn as they perform their morning prayers. The abbot is a kind and patient man who doesn’t object to the presence of curious picture-taking people.
This modern-day monastery shares its hill with a 11th century temple that looks like it has been long forgotten, though it still maintains its peaceful groundedness amidst all the dilapidation.
The monks at Phnom Krom monastery are still chanting as I watch the sun rise over Tonle Sap lake. The orange rays fall on the villages built on stilts down below just as a group of dragonflies flits by my camera lens.
I marvel at the magic of another new day. 
From my Angkor Series (7 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

http://tmblr.co/ZeR3hw1L_-uLv

Another New Day.
At 4 AM, I climb Phnom Krom Hill to visit the monks of the Phnom Krom Pagoda at dawn as they perform their morning prayers. The abbot is a kind and patient man who doesn’t object to the presence of curious picture-taking people.
This modern-day monastery shares its hill with a 11th century temple that looks like it has been long forgotten, though it still maintains its peaceful groundedness amidst all the dilapidation.
The monks at Phnom Krom monastery are still chanting as I watch the sun rise over Tonle Sap lake. The orange rays fall on the villages built on stilts down below just as a group of dragonflies flits by my camera lens.
I marvel at the magic of another new day. 
From my Angkor Series (7 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

http://tmblr.co/ZeR3hw1L_-uLv

Another New Day.

At 4 AM, I climb Phnom Krom Hill to visit the monks of the Phnom Krom Pagoda at dawn as they perform their morning prayers. The abbot is a kind and patient man who doesn’t object to the presence of curious picture-taking people.

This modern-day monastery shares its hill with a 11th century temple that looks like it has been long forgotten, though it still maintains its peaceful groundedness amidst all the dilapidation.

The monks at Phnom Krom monastery are still chanting as I watch the sun rise over Tonle Sap lake. The orange rays fall on the villages built on stilts down below just as a group of dragonflies flits by my camera lens.

I marvel at the magic of another new day. 

From my Angkor Series (7 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

Source: far-and-back

 ·  13 notes  ·  comments

19th July 2014

s
s

19th July 2014

Shouldn’t All Children Be Happy?
I agonize about this because the only kids I meet in the first couple of days in Siem Reap are those selling souvenirs at the Angkor temple complex. Their constant refrain is “buy from me, buy from me, only one dollar, just one dollar?” And as tourists walk past without buying, their little faces fall.
The kids have a perpetually aggressive stance, not unlike the countenance of the red Angry Birds on the t-shirts that several of them wear. Even the kids who find creative ways to earn their dollar - like the one who offers, “If I tell you the capital of the United States, the name of the US President, and the three biggest cities, will you buy from me?”
I ask them if they want a joy ride in a remork instead? No, just the dollar, they say. 
From my Angkor Series (6 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

http://tmblr.co/ZeR3hw1LuaAD6

Shouldn’t All Children Be Happy?
I agonize about this because the only kids I meet in the first couple of days in Siem Reap are those selling souvenirs at the Angkor temple complex. Their constant refrain is “buy from me, buy from me, only one dollar, just one dollar?” And as tourists walk past without buying, their little faces fall.
The kids have a perpetually aggressive stance, not unlike the countenance of the red Angry Birds on the t-shirts that several of them wear. Even the kids who find creative ways to earn their dollar - like the one who offers, “If I tell you the capital of the United States, the name of the US President, and the three biggest cities, will you buy from me?”
I ask them if they want a joy ride in a remork instead? No, just the dollar, they say. 
From my Angkor Series (6 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

http://tmblr.co/ZeR3hw1LuaAD6

Shouldn’t All Children Be Happy?

I agonize about this because the only kids I meet in the first couple of days in Siem Reap are those selling souvenirs at the Angkor temple complex. Their constant refrain is “buy from me, buy from me, only one dollar, just one dollar?” And as tourists walk past without buying, their little faces fall.

The kids have a perpetually aggressive stance, not unlike the countenance of the red Angry Birds on the t-shirts that several of them wear. Even the kids who find creative ways to earn their dollar - like the one who offers, “If I tell you the capital of the United States, the name of the US President, and the three biggest cities, will you buy from me?

I ask them if they want a joy ride in a remork instead? No, just the dollar, they say. 

From my Angkor Series (6 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

Source: far-and-back

 ·  16 notes  ·  comments

What type of camera do you use? I am really digging your photos and I am looking for a bit of an upgrade in my camera.

Asked by ianschechter

Hello Ian (ianschechter): Thanks! I use a Nikon D700 which is an older version of the D800. The 24-70mm F2.8 is probably the lens I use most often … and a panaromic 12-24mm for architecture and wide angle shots. I also really like my fixed length 50mm for street photography. 

#askmeaquestion

 ·  1 notes  ·  comments

18th July 2014

s
s

18th July 2014

Fig Trees and Temples.
“The fig tree is the ruler of Angkor, ruling over the palaces and over the temples that it has patiently pried apart”, wrote George Coedes in 1943.
Wandering in through the jungle early in the morning, where our remork driver drops us off at our request, we step over tree trunks and pry ourselves away from perfect little lotus ponds to come across a temple that feels both haunted and deserted, especially before the bus loads of tourists arrive.
Ta Prohm is famous for tree trunks growing through the temple walls - and for Tomb Raiders! I try my best - unsuccessfully - to conjure up a couple of monks to add character to my photos of Ta Prohm.
From my Angkor Series (5 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

http://tmblr.co/ZeR3hw1LqIuYj

Fig Trees and Temples.
“The fig tree is the ruler of Angkor, ruling over the palaces and over the temples that it has patiently pried apart”, wrote George Coedes in 1943.
Wandering in through the jungle early in the morning, where our remork driver drops us off at our request, we step over tree trunks and pry ourselves away from perfect little lotus ponds to come across a temple that feels both haunted and deserted, especially before the bus loads of tourists arrive.
Ta Prohm is famous for tree trunks growing through the temple walls - and for Tomb Raiders! I try my best - unsuccessfully - to conjure up a couple of monks to add character to my photos of Ta Prohm.
From my Angkor Series (5 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

http://tmblr.co/ZeR3hw1LqIuYj

Fig Trees and Temples.

The fig tree is the ruler of Angkor, ruling over the palaces and over the temples that it has patiently pried apart”, wrote George Coedes in 1943.

Wandering in through the jungle early in the morning, where our remork driver drops us off at our request, we step over tree trunks and pry ourselves away from perfect little lotus ponds to come across a temple that feels both haunted and deserted, especially before the bus loads of tourists arrive.

Ta Prohm is famous for tree trunks growing through the temple walls - and for Tomb Raiders! I try my best - unsuccessfully - to conjure up a couple of monks to add character to my photos of Ta Prohm.

From my Angkor Series (5 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

Source: far-and-back

 ·  36 notes  ·  comments

I don't have a question just some words to say how much i appreciate your blog which is full of things iv'e seen or want to do myself. Travelers inspiring each other.

Asked by kirstyrose

Hello, kirstyrose!

Thank you for your kind comments. Travel - especially to far and unknown lands - brings out the best in me. As Susan Sontag said - “I haven’t been everywhere but it is on my list”.

What about you? What’s on your list?

#askmeaquestion

 ·  1 notes  ·  comments

17th July 2014

s
s
s
s
s

17th July 2014

The Many Faces of Bayon. 
Best Approach to the Bayon? Don’t take the South Gate unless you are missing the traffic back home. Instead, go as we do, to the Victory Gate, then climb on the massive wall and walk on it to the East Gate - approaching Bayon through the forest for a true Indiana Jones experience. 
The incomparable Bayon has 216 half-smiling faces that could give Mona Lisa a run for her money. And each one is slightly different than the other. 
*This* is undoubtedly the most iconic and recognizable image of Angkor. I wonder which one is the original Bayon in whose image the others were crafted?
From my Angkor Series (4 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

http://tmblr.co/ZeR3hw1LkXLrz

The Many Faces of Bayon. 
Best Approach to the Bayon? Don’t take the South Gate unless you are missing the traffic back home. Instead, go as we do, to the Victory Gate, then climb on the massive wall and walk on it to the East Gate - approaching Bayon through the forest for a true Indiana Jones experience. 
The incomparable Bayon has 216 half-smiling faces that could give Mona Lisa a run for her money. And each one is slightly different than the other. 
*This* is undoubtedly the most iconic and recognizable image of Angkor. I wonder which one is the original Bayon in whose image the others were crafted?
From my Angkor Series (4 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

http://tmblr.co/ZeR3hw1LkXLrz

The Many Faces of Bayon. 
Best Approach to the Bayon? Don’t take the South Gate unless you are missing the traffic back home. Instead, go as we do, to the Victory Gate, then climb on the massive wall and walk on it to the East Gate - approaching Bayon through the forest for a true Indiana Jones experience. 
The incomparable Bayon has 216 half-smiling faces that could give Mona Lisa a run for her money. And each one is slightly different than the other. 
*This* is undoubtedly the most iconic and recognizable image of Angkor. I wonder which one is the original Bayon in whose image the others were crafted?
From my Angkor Series (4 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

http://tmblr.co/ZeR3hw1LkXLrz

The Many Faces of Bayon. 
Best Approach to the Bayon? Don’t take the South Gate unless you are missing the traffic back home. Instead, go as we do, to the Victory Gate, then climb on the massive wall and walk on it to the East Gate - approaching Bayon through the forest for a true Indiana Jones experience. 
The incomparable Bayon has 216 half-smiling faces that could give Mona Lisa a run for her money. And each one is slightly different than the other. 
*This* is undoubtedly the most iconic and recognizable image of Angkor. I wonder which one is the original Bayon in whose image the others were crafted?
From my Angkor Series (4 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

http://tmblr.co/ZeR3hw1LkXLrz

The Many Faces of Bayon. 
Best Approach to the Bayon? Don’t take the South Gate unless you are missing the traffic back home. Instead, go as we do, to the Victory Gate, then climb on the massive wall and walk on it to the East Gate - approaching Bayon through the forest for a true Indiana Jones experience. 
The incomparable Bayon has 216 half-smiling faces that could give Mona Lisa a run for her money. And each one is slightly different than the other. 
*This* is undoubtedly the most iconic and recognizable image of Angkor. I wonder which one is the original Bayon in whose image the others were crafted?
From my Angkor Series (4 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

http://tmblr.co/ZeR3hw1LkXLrz

The Many Faces of Bayon. 

Best Approach to the Bayon? Don’t take the South Gate unless you are missing the traffic back home. Instead, go as we do, to the Victory Gate, then climb on the massive wall and walk on it to the East Gate - approaching Bayon through the forest for a true Indiana Jones experience. 

The incomparable Bayon has 216 half-smiling faces that could give Mona Lisa a run for her money. And each one is slightly different than the other. 

*This* is undoubtedly the most iconic and recognizable image of Angkor. I wonder which one is the original Bayon in whose image the others were crafted?

From my Angkor Series (4 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

Source: far-and-back

 ·  31 notes  ·  comments

16th July 2014

Sunrise.
Best sunrise spot to view Angkor from?
We climb the hill at Phnom Bakheng in pitch darkness to spy on the morning as it catches its first stunning glimpse of Angkor Wat.
Angkor Wat is memorable for its gigantic size, the iconic five towers and the views from the terrace. The temple is everywhere - in the middle of the Cambodian flag, on the beer (Angkor Beer: Cambodia’s Pride) and in the pride you hear in the voices of people - of a glorious past. Go in the afternoon to visit - to avoid the crowds.
From my Angkor Series (3 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments.  Sunrise.
Best sunrise spot to view Angkor from?
We climb the hill at Phnom Bakheng in pitch darkness to spy on the morning as it catches its first stunning glimpse of Angkor Wat.
Angkor Wat is memorable for its gigantic size, the iconic five towers and the views from the terrace. The temple is everywhere - in the middle of the Cambodian flag, on the beer (Angkor Beer: Cambodia’s Pride) and in the pride you hear in the voices of people - of a glorious past. Go in the afternoon to visit - to avoid the crowds.
From my Angkor Series (3 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

Sunrise.

Best sunrise spot to view Angkor from?

We climb the hill at Phnom Bakheng in pitch darkness to spy on the morning as it catches its first stunning glimpse of Angkor Wat.

Angkor Wat is memorable for its gigantic size, the iconic five towers and the views from the terrace. The temple is everywhere - in the middle of the Cambodian flag, on the beer (Angkor Beer: Cambodia’s Pride) and in the pride you hear in the voices of people - of a glorious past. Go in the afternoon to visit - to avoid the crowds.

From my Angkor Series (3 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

Source: far-and-back

 ·  3 notes  ·  comments

15th July 2014

How Not to be Templed Out.
Pick out the must-see’s in the mini-circuit (Bayon, Angkor Wat and Ta Prohm in that order), then pick two temples in the grand-circuit (Preah Khan and Pre-Rup are my favorites), and one that requires a car (Banteay Srei or Beng Melea). Add some climbing at dawn - at Phnom Krom and Phnom Bakheng - as the sunrises here will sustain you for a whole year of waking up late. Pace yourself over three to four days.
The ubiquitous remork - Cambodia’s version of the rickshaw - swarms across Angkor, and there is a pattern to how tourists are ferried across the mini-circuit and the grand-circuit. Patterns are meant to be changed.
From my Angkor Series (2 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments.  How Not to be Templed Out.
Pick out the must-see’s in the mini-circuit (Bayon, Angkor Wat and Ta Prohm in that order), then pick two temples in the grand-circuit (Preah Khan and Pre-Rup are my favorites), and one that requires a car (Banteay Srei or Beng Melea). Add some climbing at dawn - at Phnom Krom and Phnom Bakheng - as the sunrises here will sustain you for a whole year of waking up late. Pace yourself over three to four days.
The ubiquitous remork - Cambodia’s version of the rickshaw - swarms across Angkor, and there is a pattern to how tourists are ferried across the mini-circuit and the grand-circuit. Patterns are meant to be changed.
From my Angkor Series (2 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

How Not to be Templed Out.

Pick out the must-see’s in the mini-circuit (Bayon, Angkor Wat and Ta Prohm in that order), then pick two temples in the grand-circuit (Preah Khan and Pre-Rup are my favorites), and one that requires a car (Banteay Srei or Beng Melea). Add some climbing at dawn - at Phnom Krom and Phnom Bakheng - as the sunrises here will sustain you for a whole year of waking up late. Pace yourself over three to four days.

The ubiquitous remork - Cambodia’s version of the rickshaw - swarms across Angkor, and there is a pattern to how tourists are ferried across the mini-circuit and the grand-circuit. Patterns are meant to be changed.

From my Angkor Series (2 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

Source: far-and-back

 ·  12 notes  ·  comments

14th July 2014

What is Your Definitive Image of Angkor?
The towers of Angkor Wat, enigmatic faces of Bayon, or the tree growing over temple walls at Ta Promh? Or is it Angelina Jolie & Tomb Raiders?  It’s unlikely to be this image though, of a beautiful, long-forgotten temple called Ta Keo, that was hit by lightning during construction. The Khmers were decidedly superstitious and abandoned it.
Ta Keo is a reminder that there are hundreds of exquisite temples that make up the Angkor temple complex. But there will ultimately be just two or three that surprise you, intrigue your imagination, and haunt you forever. So focus, and choose well. 
From my Angkor Series (1 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments.  What is Your Definitive Image of Angkor?
The towers of Angkor Wat, enigmatic faces of Bayon, or the tree growing over temple walls at Ta Promh? Or is it Angelina Jolie & Tomb Raiders?  It’s unlikely to be this image though, of a beautiful, long-forgotten temple called Ta Keo, that was hit by lightning during construction. The Khmers were decidedly superstitious and abandoned it.
Ta Keo is a reminder that there are hundreds of exquisite temples that make up the Angkor temple complex. But there will ultimately be just two or three that surprise you, intrigue your imagination, and haunt you forever. So focus, and choose well. 
From my Angkor Series (1 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

What is Your Definitive Image of Angkor?

The towers of Angkor Wat, enigmatic faces of Bayon, or the tree growing over temple walls at Ta Promh? Or is it Angelina Jolie & Tomb Raiders?  It’s unlikely to be this image though, of a beautiful, long-forgotten temple called Ta Keo, that was hit by lightning during construction. The Khmers were decidedly superstitious and abandoned it.

Ta Keo is a reminder that there are hundreds of exquisite temples that make up the Angkor temple complex. But there will ultimately be just two or three that surprise you, intrigue your imagination, and haunt you forever. So focus, and choose well. 

From my Angkor Series (1 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

Source: far-and-back

 ·  12 notes  ·  comments

Favorite Things.

13th July 2014

Hilton has just published a research about what makes adults happy. Sunshine, finding money in your pocket that you had forgotten all about, getting something free, and fresh sheets on your bed at the end of a tiring day, all feature in the top things.

Most of us will relate to these. Especially during travel. What else makes you happy when you travel? Unexpected acts of kindness, beautiful scenery, window seat, undisturbed sleep?

Source:

 ·  4 notes  ·  comments

9th July 2014

s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s

9th July 2014

Magical Town.
I don’t believe in magic. Except once in a blue moon. Maybe.
And then I visit Izamal in Yucatan. Izamal is one of Mexico’s 35 towns that has been *officially* declared “Pueblo Mágico”. The town is entirely painted yellow … colonial buildings, the market, the huge convent, everything! There are cobblestone streets, large iron lampposts, and the comforting sound of the clippity-clop of horses pulling the calesas.
Sitting under one of the arches of this magnificent courtyard, as twilight sets in, it gets harder to not believe in a little bit of magic.
Oh, well, this must have been a blue moon night. After all, how often do I find myself in a magical town?
Text and Photos by VJ Singh | Far/Back | Izamal, Yucatan, Mexico | Jan 2013. All Rights Reserved.
Have you been to any of the other ‘magical towns’ in Mexico? Send a picture?

http://tmblr.co/ZeR3hw1L1gDaC

Magical Town.
I don’t believe in magic. Except once in a blue moon. Maybe.
And then I visit Izamal in Yucatan. Izamal is one of Mexico’s 35 towns that has been *officially* declared “Pueblo Mágico”. The town is entirely painted yellow … colonial buildings, the market, the huge convent, everything! There are cobblestone streets, large iron lampposts, and the comforting sound of the clippity-clop of horses pulling the calesas.
Sitting under one of the arches of this magnificent courtyard, as twilight sets in, it gets harder to not believe in a little bit of magic.
Oh, well, this must have been a blue moon night. After all, how often do I find myself in a magical town?
Text and Photos by VJ Singh | Far/Back | Izamal, Yucatan, Mexico | Jan 2013. All Rights Reserved.
Have you been to any of the other ‘magical towns’ in Mexico? Send a picture?

http://tmblr.co/ZeR3hw1L1gDaC

Magical Town.
I don’t believe in magic. Except once in a blue moon. Maybe.
And then I visit Izamal in Yucatan. Izamal is one of Mexico’s 35 towns that has been *officially* declared “Pueblo Mágico”. The town is entirely painted yellow … colonial buildings, the market, the huge convent, everything! There are cobblestone streets, large iron lampposts, and the comforting sound of the clippity-clop of horses pulling the calesas.
Sitting under one of the arches of this magnificent courtyard, as twilight sets in, it gets harder to not believe in a little bit of magic.
Oh, well, this must have been a blue moon night. After all, how often do I find myself in a magical town?
Text and Photos by VJ Singh | Far/Back | Izamal, Yucatan, Mexico | Jan 2013. All Rights Reserved.
Have you been to any of the other ‘magical towns’ in Mexico? Send a picture?

http://tmblr.co/ZeR3hw1L1gDaC

Magical Town.
I don’t believe in magic. Except once in a blue moon. Maybe.
And then I visit Izamal in Yucatan. Izamal is one of Mexico’s 35 towns that has been *officially* declared “Pueblo Mágico”. The town is entirely painted yellow … colonial buildings, the market, the huge convent, everything! There are cobblestone streets, large iron lampposts, and the comforting sound of the clippity-clop of horses pulling the calesas.
Sitting under one of the arches of this magnificent courtyard, as twilight sets in, it gets harder to not believe in a little bit of magic.
Oh, well, this must have been a blue moon night. After all, how often do I find myself in a magical town?
Text and Photos by VJ Singh | Far/Back | Izamal, Yucatan, Mexico | Jan 2013. All Rights Reserved.
Have you been to any of the other ‘magical towns’ in Mexico? Send a picture?

http://tmblr.co/ZeR3hw1L1gDaC

Magical Town.
I don’t believe in magic. Except once in a blue moon. Maybe.
And then I visit Izamal in Yucatan. Izamal is one of Mexico’s 35 towns that has been *officially* declared “Pueblo Mágico”. The town is entirely painted yellow … colonial buildings, the market, the huge convent, everything! There are cobblestone streets, large iron lampposts, and the comforting sound of the clippity-clop of horses pulling the calesas.
Sitting under one of the arches of this magnificent courtyard, as twilight sets in, it gets harder to not believe in a little bit of magic.
Oh, well, this must have been a blue moon night. After all, how often do I find myself in a magical town?
Text and Photos by VJ Singh | Far/Back | Izamal, Yucatan, Mexico | Jan 2013. All Rights Reserved.
Have you been to any of the other ‘magical towns’ in Mexico? Send a picture?

http://tmblr.co/ZeR3hw1L1gDaC

Magical Town.
I don’t believe in magic. Except once in a blue moon. Maybe.
And then I visit Izamal in Yucatan. Izamal is one of Mexico’s 35 towns that has been *officially* declared “Pueblo Mágico”. The town is entirely painted yellow … colonial buildings, the market, the huge convent, everything! There are cobblestone streets, large iron lampposts, and the comforting sound of the clippity-clop of horses pulling the calesas.
Sitting under one of the arches of this magnificent courtyard, as twilight sets in, it gets harder to not believe in a little bit of magic.
Oh, well, this must have been a blue moon night. After all, how often do I find myself in a magical town?
Text and Photos by VJ Singh | Far/Back | Izamal, Yucatan, Mexico | Jan 2013. All Rights Reserved.
Have you been to any of the other ‘magical towns’ in Mexico? Send a picture?

http://tmblr.co/ZeR3hw1L1gDaC

Magical Town.
I don’t believe in magic. Except once in a blue moon. Maybe.
And then I visit Izamal in Yucatan. Izamal is one of Mexico’s 35 towns that has been *officially* declared “Pueblo Mágico”. The town is entirely painted yellow … colonial buildings, the market, the huge convent, everything! There are cobblestone streets, large iron lampposts, and the comforting sound of the clippity-clop of horses pulling the calesas.
Sitting under one of the arches of this magnificent courtyard, as twilight sets in, it gets harder to not believe in a little bit of magic.
Oh, well, this must have been a blue moon night. After all, how often do I find myself in a magical town?
Text and Photos by VJ Singh | Far/Back | Izamal, Yucatan, Mexico | Jan 2013. All Rights Reserved.
Have you been to any of the other ‘magical towns’ in Mexico? Send a picture?

http://tmblr.co/ZeR3hw1L1gDaC

Magical Town.
I don’t believe in magic. Except once in a blue moon. Maybe.
And then I visit Izamal in Yucatan. Izamal is one of Mexico’s 35 towns that has been *officially* declared “Pueblo Mágico”. The town is entirely painted yellow … colonial buildings, the market, the huge convent, everything! There are cobblestone streets, large iron lampposts, and the comforting sound of the clippity-clop of horses pulling the calesas.
Sitting under one of the arches of this magnificent courtyard, as twilight sets in, it gets harder to not believe in a little bit of magic.
Oh, well, this must have been a blue moon night. After all, how often do I find myself in a magical town?
Text and Photos by VJ Singh | Far/Back | Izamal, Yucatan, Mexico | Jan 2013. All Rights Reserved.
Have you been to any of the other ‘magical towns’ in Mexico? Send a picture?

http://tmblr.co/ZeR3hw1L1gDaC

Magical Town.

I don’t believe in magic. Except once in a blue moon. Maybe.

And then I visit Izamal in Yucatan. Izamal is one of Mexico’s 35 towns that has been *officially* declared “Pueblo Mágico”. The town is entirely painted yellow … colonial buildings, the market, the huge convent, everything! There are cobblestone streets, large iron lampposts, and the comforting sound of the clippity-clop of horses pulling the calesas.

Sitting under one of the arches of this magnificent courtyard, as twilight sets in, it gets harder to not believe in a little bit of magic.

Oh, well, this must have been a blue moon night. After all, how often do I find myself in a magical town?

Text and Photos by VJ Singh | Far/Back | Izamal, Yucatan, Mexico | Jan 2013. All Rights Reserved.

Have you been to any of the other ‘magical towns’ in Mexico? Send a picture?

Source: far-and-back

 ·  35 notes  ·  comments

6th July 2014

Jungle Paradise. 
Blancaneaux is Francis Coppola’s remote jungle paradise. Apparently, he had been searching for a setting that closely resembled the “Apocalypse Now” rainforest in the Philippines, and he finally found it halfway around the world - tucked away in the Maya Mountains of Belize. 
It was abandoned when Coppola came across it … and he writes about how he was so thrilled he had found this abandoned “perfect” spot, that he jumped with joy into the waterfall in the Privassion River - losing his glasses in the process - and shrieking like a child because the water was so cold.
The water is still very cold - as we discovered when we made our obligatory leap into the river. And then ran - with chattering teeth and total abandon - all the way to the heated pool. 
More photos of Blancaneaux Lodge. 
Most exciting activity in Belize.
Text and Photo by VJ Singh | Far/Back | Blancaneaux Lodge, San Ignacio, Belize | Dec 2010 Jungle Paradise. 
Blancaneaux is Francis Coppola’s remote jungle paradise. Apparently, he had been searching for a setting that closely resembled the “Apocalypse Now” rainforest in the Philippines, and he finally found it halfway around the world - tucked away in the Maya Mountains of Belize. 
It was abandoned when Coppola came across it … and he writes about how he was so thrilled he had found this abandoned “perfect” spot, that he jumped with joy into the waterfall in the Privassion River - losing his glasses in the process - and shrieking like a child because the water was so cold.
The water is still very cold - as we discovered when we made our obligatory leap into the river. And then ran - with chattering teeth and total abandon - all the way to the heated pool. 
More photos of Blancaneaux Lodge. 
Most exciting activity in Belize.
Text and Photo by VJ Singh | Far/Back | Blancaneaux Lodge, San Ignacio, Belize | Dec 2010

Jungle Paradise. 

Blancaneaux is Francis Coppola’s remote jungle paradise. Apparently, he had been searching for a setting that closely resembled the “Apocalypse Now” rainforest in the Philippines, and he finally found it halfway around the world - tucked away in the Maya Mountains of Belize. 

It was abandoned when Coppola came across it … and he writes about how he was so thrilled he had found this abandoned “perfect” spot, that he jumped with joy into the waterfall in the Privassion River - losing his glasses in the process - and shrieking like a child because the water was so cold.

The water is still very cold - as we discovered when we made our obligatory leap into the river. And then ran - with chattering teeth and total abandon - all the way to the heated pool. 

More photos of Blancaneaux Lodge

Most exciting activity in Belize.

Text and Photo by VJ Singh | Far/Back | Blancaneaux Lodge, San Ignacio, Belize | Dec 2010

Source: far-and-back

 ·  14 notes  ·  comments
Load More