When life gives you lemons …
… you make lemonade. 
When life gives you giant lemons, you make limoncello. (VJ Singh) :-)
Photos from Amalfi Coast, Italy, where the locals, characteristically using their hands to demonstrate, claim their lemons are ‘as large as watermelons’. A little exaggerated, but not by much. 
Photos and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | Amalfi Town | July 2014. All rights reserved.  When life gives you lemons …
… you make lemonade. 
When life gives you giant lemons, you make limoncello. (VJ Singh) :-)
Photos from Amalfi Coast, Italy, where the locals, characteristically using their hands to demonstrate, claim their lemons are ‘as large as watermelons’. A little exaggerated, but not by much. 
Photos and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | Amalfi Town | July 2014. All rights reserved. 

When life gives you lemons …

… you make lemonade.

When life gives you giant lemons, you make limoncello. (VJ Singh) :-)

Photos from Amalfi Coast, Italy, where the locals, characteristically using their hands to demonstrate, claim their lemons are ‘as large as watermelons’. A little exaggerated, but not by much. 

Photos and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | Amalfi Town | July 2014. All rights reserved. 

(Source: far-and-back)

Monastery of the Sacred Sword.
At one time, Preah Khan combined the roles of city, temple and university, with over a thousand teachers and a thousand dancers living here. This temple is in the grand-circuit and a bit of a distance away. I am glad we visited it, despite our guide discouraging us.
It has the perfect blend of ruins and structure, chaos and order, rubble and reconstruction. This is the temple that will haunt my memories forever. 
I could linger long in Preah Khan. And pretend I’m King Jayavarman VII for whom this temple was built. But it’s getting late and my guide is fidgeting.
"We have no lanterns, he says, in our carts. And we must leave before the hour of the tiger." - Pierre Loti, 1901
As you drive to the temples, you will pass by lots and lots of others - small and big. Don’t stop. Don’t be tempted. Above all, don’t let your guide bully you.
The final post of my Angkor Series (10 of 10) | Photos and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Check out my previous nine posts, as I re-lived some amazing travel moments. Monastery of the Sacred Sword.
At one time, Preah Khan combined the roles of city, temple and university, with over a thousand teachers and a thousand dancers living here. This temple is in the grand-circuit and a bit of a distance away. I am glad we visited it, despite our guide discouraging us.
It has the perfect blend of ruins and structure, chaos and order, rubble and reconstruction. This is the temple that will haunt my memories forever. 
I could linger long in Preah Khan. And pretend I’m King Jayavarman VII for whom this temple was built. But it’s getting late and my guide is fidgeting.
"We have no lanterns, he says, in our carts. And we must leave before the hour of the tiger." - Pierre Loti, 1901
As you drive to the temples, you will pass by lots and lots of others - small and big. Don’t stop. Don’t be tempted. Above all, don’t let your guide bully you.
The final post of my Angkor Series (10 of 10) | Photos and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Check out my previous nine posts, as I re-lived some amazing travel moments.

Monastery of the Sacred Sword.

At one time, Preah Khan combined the roles of city, temple and university, with over a thousand teachers and a thousand dancers living here. This temple is in the grand-circuit and a bit of a distance away. I am glad we visited it, despite our guide discouraging us.

It has the perfect blend of ruins and structure, chaos and order, rubble and reconstruction. This is the temple that will haunt my memories forever. 

I could linger long in Preah Khan. And pretend I’m King Jayavarman VII for whom this temple was built. But it’s getting late and my guide is fidgeting.

"We have no lanterns, he says, in our carts. And we must leave before the hour of the tiger." - Pierre Loti, 1901

As you drive to the temples, you will pass by lots and lots of others - small and big. Don’t stop. Don’t be tempted. Above all, don’t let your guide bully you.

The final post of my Angkor Series (10 of 10) | Photos and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Check out my previous nine posts, as I re-lived some amazing travel moments.

(Source: far-and-back)

Being Indiana Jones. 
Beng Melea is the place to ponder about how Angkor must have looked like, to explorers who found it completely in ruins. The only “restoration” here is in the form of raised wooden platforms to safely access the inside.
But at a certain point, those stop too. So the options are - climb the pile of rocks and explore further, or go back. We choose the former, much to the chagrin of our guide, who insists I have too much skirt in my long dress to scramble on rocks, walls and tree trunks. I happily prove him wrong and am treated to an amazing afternoon of discovery.
From my Angkor Series (9 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments.  Being Indiana Jones. 
Beng Melea is the place to ponder about how Angkor must have looked like, to explorers who found it completely in ruins. The only “restoration” here is in the form of raised wooden platforms to safely access the inside.
But at a certain point, those stop too. So the options are - climb the pile of rocks and explore further, or go back. We choose the former, much to the chagrin of our guide, who insists I have too much skirt in my long dress to scramble on rocks, walls and tree trunks. I happily prove him wrong and am treated to an amazing afternoon of discovery.
From my Angkor Series (9 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

Being Indiana Jones. 

Beng Melea is the place to ponder about how Angkor must have looked like, to explorers who found it completely in ruins. The only “restoration” here is in the form of raised wooden platforms to safely access the inside.

But at a certain point, those stop too. So the options are - climb the pile of rocks and explore further, or go back. We choose the former, much to the chagrin of our guide, who insists I have too much skirt in my long dress to scramble on rocks, walls and tree trunks. I happily prove him wrong and am treated to an amazing afternoon of discovery.

From my Angkor Series (9 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

(Source: far-and-back)

Evenings in Siem Reap. 
Watching thousands of fruit bats take flight from the trees outside the Raffles exactly after sunset each evening is a spectacle worth patiently waiting for.
So is watching temple flower stall owners painstakingly weave / fold floral offerings for devotees to buy. Deceptively simple, but obviously takes years of practice to perfect!
Practice is also what makes the Apsara dancers so precise in their movements. This is a classical style dating back to the Angkorean era, surviving despite being nearly wiped out during the Khmer Rouge regime. 
From my Angkor Series (8 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments.  Evenings in Siem Reap. 
Watching thousands of fruit bats take flight from the trees outside the Raffles exactly after sunset each evening is a spectacle worth patiently waiting for.
So is watching temple flower stall owners painstakingly weave / fold floral offerings for devotees to buy. Deceptively simple, but obviously takes years of practice to perfect!
Practice is also what makes the Apsara dancers so precise in their movements. This is a classical style dating back to the Angkorean era, surviving despite being nearly wiped out during the Khmer Rouge regime. 
From my Angkor Series (8 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

Evenings in Siem Reap. 

Watching thousands of fruit bats take flight from the trees outside the Raffles exactly after sunset each evening is a spectacle worth patiently waiting for.

So is watching temple flower stall owners painstakingly weave / fold floral offerings for devotees to buy. Deceptively simple, but obviously takes years of practice to perfect!

Practice is also what makes the Apsara dancers so precise in their movements. This is a classical style dating back to the Angkorean era, surviving despite being nearly wiped out during the Khmer Rouge regime. 

From my Angkor Series (8 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

(Source: far-and-back)

Another New Day.
At 4 AM, I climb Phnom Krom Hill to visit the monks of the Phnom Krom Pagoda at dawn as they perform their morning prayers. The abbot is a kind and patient man who doesn’t object to the presence of curious picture-taking people.
This modern-day monastery shares its hill with a 11th century temple that looks like it has been long forgotten, though it still maintains its peaceful groundedness amidst all the dilapidation.
The monks at Phnom Krom monastery are still chanting as I watch the sun rise over Tonle Sap lake. The orange rays fall on the villages built on stilts down below just as a group of dragonflies flits by my camera lens.
I marvel at the magic of another new day. 
From my Angkor Series (7 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments.  Another New Day.
At 4 AM, I climb Phnom Krom Hill to visit the monks of the Phnom Krom Pagoda at dawn as they perform their morning prayers. The abbot is a kind and patient man who doesn’t object to the presence of curious picture-taking people.
This modern-day monastery shares its hill with a 11th century temple that looks like it has been long forgotten, though it still maintains its peaceful groundedness amidst all the dilapidation.
The monks at Phnom Krom monastery are still chanting as I watch the sun rise over Tonle Sap lake. The orange rays fall on the villages built on stilts down below just as a group of dragonflies flits by my camera lens.
I marvel at the magic of another new day. 
From my Angkor Series (7 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments.  Another New Day.
At 4 AM, I climb Phnom Krom Hill to visit the monks of the Phnom Krom Pagoda at dawn as they perform their morning prayers. The abbot is a kind and patient man who doesn’t object to the presence of curious picture-taking people.
This modern-day monastery shares its hill with a 11th century temple that looks like it has been long forgotten, though it still maintains its peaceful groundedness amidst all the dilapidation.
The monks at Phnom Krom monastery are still chanting as I watch the sun rise over Tonle Sap lake. The orange rays fall on the villages built on stilts down below just as a group of dragonflies flits by my camera lens.
I marvel at the magic of another new day. 
From my Angkor Series (7 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

Another New Day.

At 4 AM, I climb Phnom Krom Hill to visit the monks of the Phnom Krom Pagoda at dawn as they perform their morning prayers. The abbot is a kind and patient man who doesn’t object to the presence of curious picture-taking people.

This modern-day monastery shares its hill with a 11th century temple that looks like it has been long forgotten, though it still maintains its peaceful groundedness amidst all the dilapidation.

The monks at Phnom Krom monastery are still chanting as I watch the sun rise over Tonle Sap lake. The orange rays fall on the villages built on stilts down below just as a group of dragonflies flits by my camera lens.

I marvel at the magic of another new day. 

From my Angkor Series (7 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

(Source: far-and-back)

Shouldn’t All Children Be Happy?
I agonize about this because the only kids I meet in the first couple of days in Siem Reap are those selling souvenirs at the Angkor temple complex. Their constant refrain is “buy from me, buy from me, only one dollar, just one dollar?” And as tourists walk past without buying, their little faces fall.
The kids have a perpetually aggressive stance, not unlike the countenance of the red Angry Birds on the t-shirts that several of them wear. Even the kids who find creative ways to earn their dollar - like the one who offers, “If I tell you the capital of the United States, the name of the US President, and the three biggest cities, will you buy from me?”
I ask them if they want a joy ride in a remork instead? No, just the dollar, they say. 
From my Angkor Series (6 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments.  Shouldn’t All Children Be Happy?
I agonize about this because the only kids I meet in the first couple of days in Siem Reap are those selling souvenirs at the Angkor temple complex. Their constant refrain is “buy from me, buy from me, only one dollar, just one dollar?” And as tourists walk past without buying, their little faces fall.
The kids have a perpetually aggressive stance, not unlike the countenance of the red Angry Birds on the t-shirts that several of them wear. Even the kids who find creative ways to earn their dollar - like the one who offers, “If I tell you the capital of the United States, the name of the US President, and the three biggest cities, will you buy from me?”
I ask them if they want a joy ride in a remork instead? No, just the dollar, they say. 
From my Angkor Series (6 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

Shouldn’t All Children Be Happy?

I agonize about this because the only kids I meet in the first couple of days in Siem Reap are those selling souvenirs at the Angkor temple complex. Their constant refrain is “buy from me, buy from me, only one dollar, just one dollar?” And as tourists walk past without buying, their little faces fall.

The kids have a perpetually aggressive stance, not unlike the countenance of the red Angry Birds on the t-shirts that several of them wear. Even the kids who find creative ways to earn their dollar - like the one who offers, “If I tell you the capital of the United States, the name of the US President, and the three biggest cities, will you buy from me?

I ask them if they want a joy ride in a remork instead? No, just the dollar, they say. 

From my Angkor Series (6 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

(Source: far-and-back)

Fig Trees and Temples.
“The fig tree is the ruler of Angkor, ruling over the palaces and over the temples that it has patiently pried apart”, wrote George Coedes in 1943.
Wandering in through the jungle early in the morning, where our remork driver drops us off at our request, we step over tree trunks and pry ourselves away from perfect little lotus ponds to come across a temple that feels both haunted and deserted, especially before the bus loads of tourists arrive.
Ta Prohm is famous for tree trunks growing through the temple walls - and for Tomb Raiders! I try my best - unsuccessfully - to conjure up a couple of monks to add character to my photos of Ta Prohm.
From my Angkor Series (5 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments.  Fig Trees and Temples.
“The fig tree is the ruler of Angkor, ruling over the palaces and over the temples that it has patiently pried apart”, wrote George Coedes in 1943.
Wandering in through the jungle early in the morning, where our remork driver drops us off at our request, we step over tree trunks and pry ourselves away from perfect little lotus ponds to come across a temple that feels both haunted and deserted, especially before the bus loads of tourists arrive.
Ta Prohm is famous for tree trunks growing through the temple walls - and for Tomb Raiders! I try my best - unsuccessfully - to conjure up a couple of monks to add character to my photos of Ta Prohm.
From my Angkor Series (5 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

Fig Trees and Temples.

The fig tree is the ruler of Angkor, ruling over the palaces and over the temples that it has patiently pried apart”, wrote George Coedes in 1943.

Wandering in through the jungle early in the morning, where our remork driver drops us off at our request, we step over tree trunks and pry ourselves away from perfect little lotus ponds to come across a temple that feels both haunted and deserted, especially before the bus loads of tourists arrive.

Ta Prohm is famous for tree trunks growing through the temple walls - and for Tomb Raiders! I try my best - unsuccessfully - to conjure up a couple of monks to add character to my photos of Ta Prohm.

From my Angkor Series (5 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

(Source: far-and-back)

The Many Faces of Bayon. 
Best Approach to the Bayon? Don’t take the South Gate unless you are missing the traffic back home. Instead, go as we do, to the Victory Gate, then climb on the massive wall and walk on it to the East Gate - approaching Bayon through the forest for a true Indiana Jones experience. 
The incomparable Bayon has 216 half-smiling faces that could give Mona Lisa a run for her money. And each one is slightly different than the other. 
*This* is undoubtedly the most iconic and recognizable image of Angkor. I wonder which one is the original Bayon in whose image the others were crafted?
From my Angkor Series (4 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments.  The Many Faces of Bayon. 
Best Approach to the Bayon? Don’t take the South Gate unless you are missing the traffic back home. Instead, go as we do, to the Victory Gate, then climb on the massive wall and walk on it to the East Gate - approaching Bayon through the forest for a true Indiana Jones experience. 
The incomparable Bayon has 216 half-smiling faces that could give Mona Lisa a run for her money. And each one is slightly different than the other. 
*This* is undoubtedly the most iconic and recognizable image of Angkor. I wonder which one is the original Bayon in whose image the others were crafted?
From my Angkor Series (4 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments.  The Many Faces of Bayon. 
Best Approach to the Bayon? Don’t take the South Gate unless you are missing the traffic back home. Instead, go as we do, to the Victory Gate, then climb on the massive wall and walk on it to the East Gate - approaching Bayon through the forest for a true Indiana Jones experience. 
The incomparable Bayon has 216 half-smiling faces that could give Mona Lisa a run for her money. And each one is slightly different than the other. 
*This* is undoubtedly the most iconic and recognizable image of Angkor. I wonder which one is the original Bayon in whose image the others were crafted?
From my Angkor Series (4 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments.  The Many Faces of Bayon. 
Best Approach to the Bayon? Don’t take the South Gate unless you are missing the traffic back home. Instead, go as we do, to the Victory Gate, then climb on the massive wall and walk on it to the East Gate - approaching Bayon through the forest for a true Indiana Jones experience. 
The incomparable Bayon has 216 half-smiling faces that could give Mona Lisa a run for her money. And each one is slightly different than the other. 
*This* is undoubtedly the most iconic and recognizable image of Angkor. I wonder which one is the original Bayon in whose image the others were crafted?
From my Angkor Series (4 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments.  The Many Faces of Bayon. 
Best Approach to the Bayon? Don’t take the South Gate unless you are missing the traffic back home. Instead, go as we do, to the Victory Gate, then climb on the massive wall and walk on it to the East Gate - approaching Bayon through the forest for a true Indiana Jones experience. 
The incomparable Bayon has 216 half-smiling faces that could give Mona Lisa a run for her money. And each one is slightly different than the other. 
*This* is undoubtedly the most iconic and recognizable image of Angkor. I wonder which one is the original Bayon in whose image the others were crafted?
From my Angkor Series (4 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

The Many Faces of Bayon. 

Best Approach to the Bayon? Don’t take the South Gate unless you are missing the traffic back home. Instead, go as we do, to the Victory Gate, then climb on the massive wall and walk on it to the East Gate - approaching Bayon through the forest for a true Indiana Jones experience. 

The incomparable Bayon has 216 half-smiling faces that could give Mona Lisa a run for her money. And each one is slightly different than the other. 

*This* is undoubtedly the most iconic and recognizable image of Angkor. I wonder which one is the original Bayon in whose image the others were crafted?

From my Angkor Series (4 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

(Source: far-and-back)

Sunrise.
Best sunrise spot to view Angkor from?
We climb the hill at Phnom Bakheng in pitch darkness to spy on the morning as it catches its first stunning glimpse of Angkor Wat.
Angkor Wat is memorable for its gigantic size, the iconic five towers and the views from the terrace. The temple is everywhere - in the middle of the Cambodian flag, on the beer (Angkor Beer: Cambodia’s Pride) and in the pride you hear in the voices of people - of a glorious past. Go in the afternoon to visit - to avoid the crowds.
From my Angkor Series (3 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

Sunrise.

Best sunrise spot to view Angkor from?

We climb the hill at Phnom Bakheng in pitch darkness to spy on the morning as it catches its first stunning glimpse of Angkor Wat.

Angkor Wat is memorable for its gigantic size, the iconic five towers and the views from the terrace. The temple is everywhere - in the middle of the Cambodian flag, on the beer (Angkor Beer: Cambodia’s Pride) and in the pride you hear in the voices of people - of a glorious past. Go in the afternoon to visit - to avoid the crowds.

From my Angkor Series (3 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

(Source: far-and-back)

How Not to be Templed Out.
Pick out the must-see’s in the mini-circuit (Bayon, Angkor Wat and Ta Prohm in that order), then pick two temples in the grand-circuit (Preah Khan and Pre-Rup are my favorites), and one that requires a car (Banteay Srei or Beng Melea). Add some climbing at dawn - at Phnom Krom and Phnom Bakheng - as the sunrises here will sustain you for a whole year of waking up late. Pace yourself over three to four days.
The ubiquitous remork - Cambodia’s version of the rickshaw - swarms across Angkor, and there is a pattern to how tourists are ferried across the mini-circuit and the grand-circuit. Patterns are meant to be changed.
From my Angkor Series (2 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

How Not to be Templed Out.

Pick out the must-see’s in the mini-circuit (Bayon, Angkor Wat and Ta Prohm in that order), then pick two temples in the grand-circuit (Preah Khan and Pre-Rup are my favorites), and one that requires a car (Banteay Srei or Beng Melea). Add some climbing at dawn - at Phnom Krom and Phnom Bakheng - as the sunrises here will sustain you for a whole year of waking up late. Pace yourself over three to four days.

The ubiquitous remork - Cambodia’s version of the rickshaw - swarms across Angkor, and there is a pattern to how tourists are ferried across the mini-circuit and the grand-circuit. Patterns are meant to be changed.

From my Angkor Series (2 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

(Source: far-and-back)

What is Your Definitive Image of Angkor?
The towers of Angkor Wat, enigmatic faces of Bayon, or the tree growing over temple walls at Ta Promh? Or is it Angelina Jolie & Tomb Raiders?  It’s unlikely to be this image though, of a beautiful, long-forgotten temple called Ta Keo, that was hit by lightning during construction. The Khmers were decidedly superstitious and abandoned it.
Ta Keo is a reminder that there are hundreds of exquisite temples that make up the Angkor temple complex. But there will ultimately be just two or three that surprise you, intrigue your imagination, and haunt you forever. So focus, and choose well. 
From my Angkor Series (1 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

What is Your Definitive Image of Angkor?

The towers of Angkor Wat, enigmatic faces of Bayon, or the tree growing over temple walls at Ta Promh? Or is it Angelina Jolie & Tomb Raiders?  It’s unlikely to be this image though, of a beautiful, long-forgotten temple called Ta Keo, that was hit by lightning during construction. The Khmers were decidedly superstitious and abandoned it.

Ta Keo is a reminder that there are hundreds of exquisite temples that make up the Angkor temple complex. But there will ultimately be just two or three that surprise you, intrigue your imagination, and haunt you forever. So focus, and choose well. 

From my Angkor Series (1 of 10) | Photo and text by VJ Singh | Far/Back | January 2012. All rights reserved. Look for a new post/picture from Angkor everyday as I re-live some amazing travel moments. 

(Source: far-and-back)

Favorite Things.

Hilton has just published a research about what makes adults happy. Sunshine, finding money in your pocket that you had forgotten all about, getting something free, and fresh sheets on your bed at the end of a tiring day, all feature in the top things.

Most of us will relate to these. Especially during travel. What else makes you happy when you travel? Unexpected acts of kindness, beautiful scenery, window seat, undisturbed sleep?

(Source: )